Over The Moon

An Apollo Odyssey

Getting Started

Greetings Space Explorer! This interactive site was build to take you on a journey through the Apollo Space Program.

Feel Free to navigate the site to begin your adventure through the cosmos It's not too late to learn a few things!

Houston, Blast off!

"Not because they are easy, but because they are hard"


John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Did you know?

27 astronauts came from Ohio, USA

That's 7% of all American astronauts!

January 27, 1967

Apollo I

Edward White

Command Module Pilot

Edward White

Gus Grissom

Commander

Gus Grissom

Roger Chaffee

Lunar Module Pilot

Roger Chaffee

AS-204

Command Module

AS-204

N/A

Lunar Module

N/A

Saturn IB

Saturn Rocket

Saturn IB

Mission Synopsis

Due to poor quality control, a fire errupted in the cabin during a rehearsal launch, killing all three crew members.

The crew knew the missions were rushed due to the space race, and expressed concern coming up to the initial launch.

NASA held a ceremony of remembrance and retired Apollo I on April 24, 1967.

Where are Apollo 2-6?

After the fire of Apollo I killed White, Grissom, and Chaffee, there was a big controversy regarding the safety of the program. NASA decided to bump up their quality control and launched five unmanned missions as a test of confidence before putting another human into space. A year later, Apollo VII became the next manned flight.

October 11-22, 1968

Apollo VII

Donn Eisele

Command Module Pilot

Donn Eisele

Wally Schirra

Commander

Wally Schirra

Walt Cunningham

Lunar Module Pilot

Walt Cunningham

AS-205

Command Module

AS-205

N/A

Lunar Module

N/A

Saturn IB

Saturn Rocket

Saturn IB

Mission Synopsis

This successful 11 day orbital test flight was the first to ever be broadcasted as live television.

It gave NASA the opportunity to launch the upcoming command module around the moon.

Did you know?

Yuri Gargarin was the first human in space

36 days before America's own Alan Shepard hit the stratosphere


"People, let us preserve and increase this beauty, not destroy it!"


Yuri Gargarin, on viewing Earth from Vostok I, April 1961

December 21-27, 1968

Apollo VIII

James Lovell

Command Module Pilot

James Lovell

Frank Borman

Commander

Frank Borman

William Anders

Lunar Module Pilot

William Anders

AS-503

Command Module

AS-503

N/A

Lunar Module

N/A

Saturn V

Saturn Rocket

Saturn V

Mission Synopsis

Lovell, Borman, and Anders became the first astronauts to travel beyond the low earths orbit and see the entire earth in their field of view.

They also became the first ever astronauts to see the far side of the moon.


"I’m coming back in, and it’s the saddest moment of my life"


Ed White, Gemini IV, June 1965

March 3-13, 1969

Apollo IX

David Scott

Command Module Pilot

David Scott

James McDivitt

Commander

James McDivitt

Rusty Schweickart

Lunar Module Pilot

Rusty Schweickart

Gumdrop

Command Module

Gumdrop

Spider

Lunar Module

Spider

Saturn V

Saturn Rocket

Saturn V

Mission Synopsis

This launch tested several aspects critical towards landing on the moon. Such aspects that needed testing included Lunar Module engines, backpack life support systems, navigation systems, and docking maneuvers.


"Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known"


Carl Sagan, Astronomist, 1977

May 18-26, 1969

Apollo X

John Young

Command Module Pilot

John Young

Thomas Stafford

Commander

Thomas Stafford

Eugene Carnan

Lunar Module Pilot

Eugene Carnan

Charlie Brown

Command Module

Charlie Brown

Snoopy

Lunar Module

Snoopy

Saturn V

Saturn Rocket

Saturn V

Mission Synopsis

This launch was to test all procedures and components critical to landing on the moon. The lunar module came within 8.4 nautical miles of the lunar surface during practice maneuvers.

This mission gave NASA the last vote of confidence towards landing the first ever humans on the moon.


"Houston, Tranquillity Base here. The Eagle has landed"


Neil Armstrong, Apollo XI, July 1969

June 16-July 24, 1969

Apollo XI

Michael Collins

Command Module Pilot

Michael Collins

Neil Armstrong

Commander

Neil Armstrong

Buzz Aldrin

Lunar Module Pilot

Buzz Aldrin

Columbia

Command Module

Columbia

Eagle

Lunar Module

Eagle

Saturn V

Saturn Rocket

Saturn V

Mission Synopsis

"That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind"

The first spaceflight to land humans on the moon. Armstrong set his first step on the moon on July 21 1969, 02:56 UTC, six hours after he and Aldrin successfully landed the Lunar Module “Eagle”.


"I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small"


Neil Armstrong, Apollo XI, July 1969

November 24-24, 1969

Apollo XII

Richard Gordon

Command Module Pilot

Richard Gordon

Charles Conrad

Commander

Charles Conrad

Alan Bean

Lunar Module Pilot

Alan Bean

Yankee Clipper

Command Module

Yankee Clipper

Intrepid

Lunar Module

Intrepid

Saturn V

Saturn Rocket

Saturn V

Mission Synopsis

Astronauts Gordon, Conrad, and Bean performed one day and seven hours of lunar activity. The astronauts brought the first color camera to the moon, but was inevitability damaged by the gamma rays from the sun.


"Houston, we've had a problem here"


John Swigert, Apollo XIII, April 1970

April 11-17, 1970

Apollo XIII

John Swigert

Command Module Pilot

John Swigert

James Lovell

Commander

James Lovell

Fred Haise

Lunar Module Pilot

Fred Haise

Odyssey

Command Module

Odyssey

Aquarius

Lunar Module

Aquarius

Saturn V

Saturn Rocket

Saturn V

Mission Synopsis

Days into the trip, an oxygen tank in the command module exploded, aborting the mission to land on the moon.

Limited in water, heat, and power (smaller than handheld calculators today), astronauts Swigert, Lovell, and Haise slingshoted around the moon and landed safely back home on Earth.


"The probability of success is difficult to estimate; but if we never search the chance of success is zero"


Giuseppe Cocconi, on interstellar communications, September 1959

January 31-February 9, 1971

Apollo XIV

Stuart Roosa

Command Module Pilot

Stuart Roosa

Alan Shepard

Commander

Alan Shepard

Edgar Mitchell

Lunar Module Pilot

Edgar Mitchell

Kitty Hawk

Command Module

Kitty Hawk

Antares

Lunar Module

Antares

Saturn V

Saturn Rocket

Saturn V

Mission Synopsis

Shepard became the first man to perform a "Moon Shot" with golf clubs.

Roosa brought seeds that were exposed on the mission. Later they were planted on Earth as "Moon Trees".

Did you know?

Alan Shepard performed the first "Moon Shot"

Currently, there are three golf balls on the moon


"When I first looked back at the Earth, standing on the Moon, I cried"


Alan Shepard, Apollo XIV, February 1971

July 26-August 7, 1971

Apollo XV

Alfred Worden

Command Module Pilot

Alfred Worden

David Scott

Commander

David Scott

James Irwin

Lunar Module Pilot

James Irwin

Endeavour

Command Module

Endeavour

Falcon

Lunar Module

Falcon

Moon Buggy

Lunar Rover

Moon Buggy

Mission Synopsis

This was NASA’s first use of the lunar roving vehicle. They named it the Moon Buggy as a play of words on the American “Dune Buggy”.


"The Moon was the most spectacularly beautiful desert you could ever imagine. Unspoilt. Untouched."


Charles Duke, Apollo XVI, July 1971

April 16-27, 1972

Apollo XVI

Thomas Mattingly

Command Module Pilot

Thomas Mattingly

John Young

Commander

John Young

Charles Duke

Lunar Module Pilot

Charles Duke

Casper

Command Module

Casper

Orion

Lunar Module

Orion

Moon Buggy

Lunar Rover

Moon Buggy

Mission Synopsis

This was NASA’s second use of the lunar roving vehicle. During this mission the astronauts collected samples of moon rocks to explore the moon's volcanic origins.


"In a very real sense, it will not be one man going to the moon it will be an entire nation"


John F. Kennedy, on the "Space Race", September 1962

December 7-19, 1972

Apollo XVII

Ronald Evans

Command Module Pilot

Ronald Evans

Eugene Cernan

Commander

Eugene Cernan

Harrison Schmitt

Lunar Module Pilot

Harrison Schmitt

America

Command Module

America

Challenger

Lunar Module

Challenger

Moon Buggy

Lunar Rover

Moon Buggy

Mission Synopsis

This was NASA’s final Apollo mission... the end of an era. It holds the record for longest time in lunar orbit of 6 days.

To this date, it still remains the last time humans set foot on the moon...

What will the years ahead bring?



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